Jonathan Singer

Jonathan Singer

Assistant Professor

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

Phone:848-445-3328
Email:jonathan.singer@rutgers.edu
Office:D-156
Office Hours: By appointment
Website: Hybrid Micro/Nanomanufacturing Laboratory

Jonathan Singer’s primary research interest is the generation of hierarchically structured materials via scalable micro/nanomanufacturing processes to incorporate the extraordinary properties of nanostructures into complex geometries. This is accomplished through combinations of “bottom-up” and “top-down” lithographic techniques. Such hybrid techniques shift the burden of high resolution patterning to a high-throughput process, while retaining a sufficient degree of control for targeted applications in, for example, alternative energy, microrobotics, and medical implants. Previously, Jonathan conducted his doctoral research at MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering focusing on hybrid laser direct write lithography for phoxonic metamaterials and completed a Postdoctoral Associateship at Yale University’s Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering primarily researching the nanoimprint of photovoltaic materials and bulk metallic glass alloys. He has been recognized by the Materials Research Society through their Silver Graduate Student Award and was recently named a Yale Scientific Teaching Fellow.

Education

PhD, Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2013
M.S., Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, 2008
B.S., Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, 2008

Research Interests

Development of hybrid micro/nanomanufacturing methods to enable the integration of deliberately nanostructured hierarchical architectures into high-throughput fabrication processes. Our current research focuses on shifting the burden of nanoscale resolution from a costly or slow technique to a more scalable approach by combining “top-down” and “bottom-up” strategies, such as laser direct write and self-assembly or machining and 3D nanomaterial deposition. In this way, we aim to achieve spatial control over both the structure and function of a multiscale material to enable enhanced optical and biomanipulation properties and "smart" materials behaviors, such as tunable metamaterials and actuatable microrobotics.